Airbnb Host Says There is a “Washer”

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I wanted to find a place to stay in Bacolod for a week that had a washer and dryer. I used the filter to specify for a washer. The host’s listing showed up as one of the results. I contacted her and asked if they had the washer in the unit, to which she responded that they had a “laundry shop” located at the ground floor of the building. Having lived in America for twenty years, I assumed that she meant a laundromat, so I decided to book for a week.

When I arrived at Cityscape to check in, the nosy security guard begged me for two pesos to pay for photocopying my ID. I wondered why he was not given funds for operating expenses. It felt cheap. Guess what? The word “cheap” describes the rest of her offering.

Compared to my previous stay at residences that cost a few more dollars per night, this condo unit offered half the value. The building was so-so, the studio and bathroom was half the size and the balcony was less than a quarter in comparison. That previous place also had a washer in the unit. The interior of this condo was alright, nothing to talk about to folks at home. At least the wifi was better than most places.

When I pulled up the curtain next to the small dining table, the window was not clean. There was a smudge that resembled bird poop. Best to let the curtains down. Then I opened the cupboard and lo and behold, there was a Tetra Pak of cooking oil that was already opened. I was like, “I didn’t ask for cooking oil but boy this is unsanitary and oh so cheap.”

Here’s the reason I asked for a washer and dryer and was willing to pay extra: I had met a handsome young man online who lived in Bacolod while I was staying in Iloilo. He was a sweet, charming, and wanted to become intimate. We met in person and found each other attractive. I invited him over to my place and intended to list him as one of my registered guests. We had an awesome time as you would expect of mutually infatuated adults who scored big.

The next morning, I pulled off the sheets, collected all used towels, and added my worn clothes. I tidied the room and then went downstairs to the “laundry shop”. As it turned out, there were no washers nor dryers in the building. The “laundry shop” was a collecting area where they bag you dirty laundry to be washed and dried offsite. The regular rate meant that your laundry is returned after two days at night time, but by paying double you get your laundry back by the end of the day.

I was obviously pissed off. I wouldn’t have clean sheets and towels nor clothes until at least overnight. I contacted the host and complained about being mislead. She responded by being obstinate and insinuated that it was my fault that I, an American, thought there were actual washers and dryers in the building. She was not forthcoming about the true nature of this so-called “laundry shop”.

I complained to Airbnb directly and wanted them to cancel the rest of my stay and be refunded properly for being duped, but ironically the representative replied by saying that the host did nothing wrong and she was vetted. What a sham. I told the representative that she ought to consult a dictionary to know what a washer is. In fact, I should have referred her and the host to use Google Images to see what a washer actually looks like. If you checked the box that says you have a washer, you should have an actual washer in the facility, not some collection site where they couldn’t get the job done on time compared to having an actual washer in house.

Nothing was resolved and the Airbnb closed the ticket. What a laughable disappointment. I’m glad I only used Airbnb a few times. I’m deleting their app once my week is over. I vowed not to use them again. I have heard horror stories and now I have one of my own to tell.

Posted in Airbnb Guest Stories and tagged , , , , , .

3 Comments

  1. TMI.

    Did you ever register your Tinder date as a guest?

    Unregistered guests are a liability…and so are many registered ones.

  2. “Compared to my previous stay at residences that cost a few more dollars per night, this condo unit offered half the value. The building was so-so, the studio and bathroom was half the size and the balcony was less than a quarter in comparison. That previous place also had a washer in the unit. The interior of this condo was alright, nothing to talk about to folks at home. At least the wifi was better than most places”.

    You sound like the guest from hell.
    You’re paying $28 a night and complain about the value.

    “Here’s the reason I asked for a washer and dryer and was willing to pay extra: I had met a handsome young man online who lived in Bacolod while I was staying in Iloilo. He was a sweet, charming, and wanted to become intimate. We met in person and found each other attractive. I invited him over to my place and intended to list him as one of my registered guests. We had an awesome time as you would expect of mutually infatuated adults who scored big”.

    If your reason for traveling there was to hook up with someone, next time you might want to spend a few more dollars.

  3. ” I assumed that she meant a laundromat, so I decided to book for a week.” You assumed. When you assume, it makes an ass of u and me and now you’re trying to blame the hostess for your assuming incorrectly. You should have clarified it with her if “laundry shop” was the same as a laundromat.
    In any event, why couldn’t you’ve just asked the hostess for another set of bed linen while your dirty linen was in the wash?

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